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Healthcare Information Systems Solutions since 1980
October 9, 2012 / Issue 47

In This Issue

Reduce cost of ownership by 35% with Category 6A network cabling in hospitals

Analysis: When implanted medical devices go wrong, who pays?

CDC: 13,000 patients may have been exposed to fungus

Could expired drugs cut the U.S. health bill?

Study: Most seniors’ ER visits could be avoided

Cloud computing saves healthcare industry time and money

What your breath reveals about your health

Is it possible to be too clean? Researchers say yes

Nurses' assessment of hospital quality often right on

Busting common myths about the flu vaccine

Most popular last issue: Bizarre tumor case may lead to custom cancer care

Hot Clips: Mobile Technologies


White paper

6 Critical Tips Regarding Hospital Smartphone Integration

Amcom 6 Critical Tips Regarding Hospital Smartphone Integration
As more and more hospitals work to incorporate smartphones into their communication network, many have had difficult experiences due to poor integrations strategies. This white paper will help you avoid common mistakes.

Read the white paper >


Featured Article: Infrastructure

Reduce cost of ownership by 35% with Category 6A network cabling in hospitals

Belden’s comprehensive cost study and total cost-of-ownership (TCO) analysis for Category 6A, Category 6 and Category 5e network cabling in new hospital construction makes a compelling case for the use of highest-performance Category 6A cabling systems.

By Rod Sampson, Belden

Read the HMT featured article >

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Legal

Analysis: When implanted medical devices go wrong, who pays?

Insurance companies, often stuck with the tab for health services when a medical device fails, are ready to share the pain.

Read the Reuters article. >

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Hospitals

CDC: 13,000 patients may have been exposed to fungus

As many as 13,000 patients across the country got steroid injections that may have been contaminated by a fungus linked to a rare form of meningitis that has killed eight people, federal officials said Monday.

Read the Washington Post article. >

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Rx

Could expired drugs cut the U.S. health bill?

With drug shortages and a bloated national health bill, what if expired medications were still effective?

Read the Chicago Tribune article. >

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ER

Study: Most seniors’ ER visits could be avoided

Nearly 60 percent of Medicare beneficiary visits to emergency rooms and 25 percent of their hospital admissions were “potentially preventable” had patients received better care at home or in outpatient settings, according to results of a study released Friday by a congressional advisory board.

Read the KHN article. >

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Innovations

Cloud computing saves healthcare industry time and money

The cloud's vast computing power is making it easier and less expensive for companies and clinicians to discover new drugs and medical treatments.

Read the NPR article. >

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Personal Health

What your breath reveals about your health

It's the ultimate noninvasive medical test: A growing number of health problems can be diagnosed by analyzing a patient's breath alone.

Read the WSJ article. >

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Personal Health

Is it possible to be too clean? Researchers say yes

If you’ve been feeling guilty because you can’t keep your house spotless, stop.

Read the NBC News article. >

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Hospitals

Nurses' assessment of hospital quality often right on

A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing affirms a straightforward premise: Nurses are accurate barometers of hospital quality.

Read the ScienceDaily article. >

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Personal Health

Busting common myths about the flu vaccine

Many people buy into the long-held myths about the flu vaccine and miss opportunities to avoid getting sick.

Read the Nationwide Children's Hospital article. >

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Most popular last issue: Innovations

Bizarre tumor case may lead to custom cancer care

It's a medical nightmare: a 24-year-old man endures 350 surgeries since childhood to remove growths that keep coming back in his throat and have spread to his lungs, threatening his life. Now doctors have found a way to help him by way of a scientific coup that holds promise for millions of cancer patients.

Read the AP article. >

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Hot Clips

Hot Clips: Mobile Technologies

Click on the highlighted links below to read the top HMT archival properties concerning mobile technologies, a topic that is at the forefront of healthcare discussions.

  1. Powerful stuff: Battery life and charge time for carts
  2. Tablet PCs: More functions, better healthcare
  3. How to leverage smartphone technologies

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HMT celebrates 32 years


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