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KLAS report: Hospitals confirm anesthesia information management systems provide increased efficiency, earlier billing, and improved data mining

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OREM, Utah - May 4, 2011 - Healthcare initiatives such as meaningful use have diverted resources to focus on hospital-wide applications, such as EMRs. This focus on an electronic culture also is pushing interest toward departmental systems, including anesthesia documentation. In a new research report titled Anesthesia Study 2011: Part of a Growing Electronic Culture, KLAS investigates the challenges and benefits of an anesthesia information management system (AIMS), as well as the ten most talked about AIMS vendors.

"Though historically slow to develop, the AIMS market is experiencing growing momentum," states Mark Allphin, KLAS research director and author of the report. "This suggests an increase in purchasing activity in the future. As hospitals move to an increasingly electronic recording culture, many will see value in the increased documentation abilities, including improved efficiency, a safer patient environment, reduced liability, and quicker billing."

The study found that with rare exception, enterprise integration wins out over best-of-breed. In a study of 189 North American respondents, KLAS determined that best-of breed solutions garnered higher customer satisfaction, but that an integrated AIMS system from a vendor already in place is preferred long-term. Hospitals using a best-of-breed surgery system often select an AIMS solution from the same vendor, despite a decrease in functionality, opting for better integration and familiarity with the vendor. On the other hand, some providers opt for best-of-breed AIMS systems; despite the added struggle with integration, best-of-breed solutions tend to be stable, robust, and very easy to use, with more out-of-the-box functionality.

"Five vendors claim the largest market share," notes Allphin, "Cerner, Draeger, GE, Philips and Picis; five additional vendors-Epic, iMDsoft, McKesson, Merge, and Surgical Information Systems-are still making inroads. While AIMS offerings have matured, key needs cited by AIMS customers include usability, integration, and reporting.

In a year-over-year analysis, KLAS noted that in 2007, 6 percent of surgery departments using surgery management systems also used an AIMS, with another 36 percent planning to buy one; but by 2010, only 26 percent reported having an AIMS in place. In 2010, 63 percent of hospitals using only surgery systems planned on purchasing an AIMS, and several new vendors have entered the market in response to consumer demand. In fact, this is now a market where the vendors are ready to supply before the providers are ready to buy.

To learn more about anesthesia information management systems, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of participating vendors, the report Anesthesia Study 2011: Part of a Growing Electronic Culture is now available online to healthcare providers for a significant discount off the standard retail price; platinum providers receive an additional 25 percent discount. To purchase the full report, please visit www.KLASresearch.com/reports.

 


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