HMT: PCPs use of HIT, Phillips launch new HI solutions, prescription Google Glasses, and more
To view this email in your browser, please click here.
HMT on Facebook HMT on Twitter   HMT on LinkedIn 
Health Management Technology News
January 28, 2014
New! Graduate programs in Health Informatics

In this issue:

Where are we on the diffusion curve? Trends and drivers of primary care physicians' use of health information technology

Philips launches new Healthcare Informatics Solutions and Services business group

Google Glass: Now with designer frames and prescription lenses

Spy agencies tap data streaming from phone apps

Do you have what it takes to be considered “tech savvy?”


Where are we on the diffusion curve? Trends and drivers of primary care physicians' use of health information technology

Synopsis

Adoption of health information technology (HIT) by physician practices rose considerably from 2009 to 2012, yet solo physicians lag practices of 20 or more and certain functions—like electronically exchanging information with other physicians—have been adopted by only a minority of providers. Physicians who are part of an integrated delivery system, share resources with other practices, and are eligible for financial incentives, have higher rates of HIT adoption.

The Issue

Doctors are using HIT in greater numbers, spurred on in part by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009, which provided billions to help build a national HIT infrastructure. Commonwealth Fund researchers analyzed data from surveys of primary care physicians conducted in 2009 and 2012 to check on the progress of HIT adoption and to see how certain factors—like being part of an integrated health system or using shared technical assistance programs—can influence technology take-up.

Read the full The Commonwealth Fund study here

Return to the table of contents >


Philips launches new Healthcare Informatics Solutions and Services business group

Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA) today announced the formation of Healthcare Informatics Solutions and Services, a new business group within Philips' Healthcare sector that offers hospitals and health systems the customized clinical programs, advanced data analytics and interoperable, cloud-based platforms necessary to implement new models of care.

Building off a proven track record in improving the health of aging and at-risk populations, Healthcare Informatics Solutions and Services will partner with healthcare providers to improve access, lower cost and enhance quality across the continuum of care, from screening and diagnosis, to treatment and monitoring, and finally after care at home.

"Healthcare systems today are changing the way they operate, how decisions are made and how patients receive care," said Deborah DiSanzo, chief executive officer, Philips Healthcare. "This requires a significant overhaul of complex organizations, as well as the associated actionable data about each patient population they serve. As we continue to expand the tools, analytics, consulting and support, we are paving the way for providers to transition into more integrated, collaborative care."

Healthcare Informatics Solutions and Services will be led by Jeroen Tas, who previously served as the chief information officer of Philips, and will represent the next step in the evolution of Philips, responding to increasing demand by major health systems worldwide. For example, last year Philips signed a 15-year alliance with Georgia Regents Medical Center (GRMC), enabling Georgia's renowned public academic health center to transition to a more patient-centered approach to care and an innovative business model that addresses current and future clinical, operational and equipment needs of GRMC's multiple sites.

Read the full PR Newswire news release here

Return to the table of contents >


Google Glass: Now with designer frames and prescription lenses

Google Glass is getting glasses.

Google is adding prescription frames and new styles of detachable sunglasses to its computerized, Internet-connected goggles known as Glass.

The move comes as Google Inc. prepares to make Glass available to the general population later this year. Currently, Glass is available only to the tens of thousands of people who are testing and creating apps for it.

Glass hasn't actually had glasses in its frame until now.

Glass is basically a small computer, with a camera and a display screen above the wearer's right eye. The device sits roughly at eyebrow level, higher than where eyeglasses would go.

It lets wearers surf the Web, ask for directions and take photos or videos. Akin to wearing a smartphone without having to hold it in your hands, Glass also lets people read their email, share photos on Twitter and Facebook, translate phrases while traveling or partake in video chats.

The gadget itself is not changing with this announcement. Rather, Google plans to make various attachments available. Starting Tuesday, the Mountain View, Calif., company is offering four styles of prescription frames and two new types of shades available to its "explorers" — the people who are trying out Glass. The frames will cost $225 and the shades, $150. That's on top of the $1,500 price of Glass. Users can take the frames to any vision care provider for prescription lenses, though Google says it is working with insurance provider Vision Service Plan to train eye-care providers around the U.S. on how to work with Glass. Google says some insurance plans may cover the cost of the frames.

Glass's designers picked four basic but distinct frame styles. On one end is a chunky "bold" style that stands out. On the other is a "thin" design — to blend in as much as possible.

Google won't be able to compete with the thousands of styles offered at typical eyeglasses stores. Instead, Glass's designers looked at what types of glasses are most popular, what people wear the most and, importantly, what they look good in.

The latter has been a constant challenge for the nascent wearable technology industry, especially for something like Google Glass, designed to be worn on your face. When Google unveiled Glass in a video nearly two years ago, it drew unfavorable comparisons to Bluetooth headsets, the trademarks of the fashion-ignorant technophile.

Read the full Denver Post article here

Return to the table of contents >


Spy agencies tap data streaming from phone apps

When a smartphone user opens Angry Birds, the popular game application, and starts slinging birds at chortling green pigs, spies could be lurking in the background to snatch data revealing the player’s location, age, sex and other personal information, according to secret British intelligence documents.

In their globe-spanning surveillance for terrorism suspects and other targets, the National Security Agency and its British counterpart have been trying to exploit a basic byproduct of modern telecommunications: With each new generation of mobile phone technology, ever greater amounts of personal data pour onto networks where spies can pick it up.

According to dozens of previously undisclosed classified documents, among the most valuable of those unintended intelligence tools are so-called leaky apps that spew everything from the smartphone identification codes of users to where they have been that day.

Read the full New York Times article here

Return to the table of contents >


Do you have what it takes to be considered “tech savvy?”

For the last 34 years Health Management Technology has been exploring and chronicling the growth and development of computers and other technologies used in healthcare organizations to provide high-quality patient care.

This year we’d like to shine a light on those hospitals, hospital systems and integrated delivery networks (IDNs) that make optimal decisions about the tech they need and want (in that order) and use it effectively and efficiently. We’re not just looking to recognize those organizations with deep pockets that allow them to stock up on all the latest tools. Instead, we’re looking to recognize those facilities that make optimal use of the tech they have – leaving few capabilities ever untouched – whether large or small, cash-full or cash-strapped.

Here’s where we need your help. Within your organization or within your customer base, who’s using technology and how are they using it to do top-notch, innovative work? We plan to publish mini-profiles of these organizations in HMT’s March 2014 edition, relying on your nominations.

Please submit your recommendations to HMT via email to hmt@npcomm.com no later than Thursday, January 30th. In your submission, please include who you view as the top five hospital, hospital system and/or IDN organizations in terms of their use of technology. (Please provide the organization name, city, state and proper contact information, including name, title, email and telephone number, for each of the five organizations you nominate.) Please highlight in a few bullet points and/or sentences (500 words max) why you believe each organization’s operation measures up to being “tech savvy.”

We look forward to hearing from you and then sharing your recommendation with our readers in March.

Return to the table of contents >


> READ ALL NEWS AT HEALTHMGTTECH.COM


Advertisement
A single test could cost your hospital millions


Advertisement
View the NEW exciting White Papers and Webinars on HMT!

Surviving value-based purchasing in healthcare

Late-binding: Why you DON'T need a comprehensive data warehouse model

Click here to read these white papers. >


February  2014  HMT digital book


Industry News


1.28.14
 
 
 
 
Aurora shooting mass casualty response to be detailed at HIMSS14
The University of Colorado Hospital will present “The Role of Automation in Mass Casualty Events, ” detailing how its...
Read more>>
1.27.14
 
 
 
 
Compliance professionals to meet for HCCA's 18th Annual Compliance Institute
Today’s health care industry is undergoing massive restructuring and compliance professionals must keep abreast of all the...
Read more>>
1.27.14
 
 
 
 
NY Governor Cuomo includes health IT in annual budget
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo worked with New York State Senate and Assembly leadership to introduce their budget bills on...
Read more>>
1.27.14
 
 
 
 
CDC releases report on physician EHR adoption
This month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a new data brief titled "Use and Characteristics of...
Read more>>

Resources

Solutions Showcase

Events

Archives

Subscribe to HMT

Resource Guide

Media Kit

Products

Career Builder

White Papers

Advertising Inquiries

Editorial Inquiries

Website and Newsletter Inquiries

Subscription Inquiries

HMT Online Only features

Subscribe to the
HMT newsletter


Subscribe to Health Management Technology | Contact the Publisher | Advertise With Us  |   Privacy Statement

Copyright 2014 NP Communications LLC, 2477 Stickney Point Rd, Suite 221B, Sarasota, FL 34231