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August 7, 2012 / Issue 37

In This Issue

Why online social networking should change what we know about healthcare

Patient data outage exposes risks of electronic medical records

Nursing schools struggling to find professors

Scalpel-throwing surgeons stun anger management pioneer

Cash rewards keep people on their medications

Hospitals investigate start-up technologies for superbug disinfection

Less hospital noise improves patient care

Scientists treat ulcers with 'spray-on skin'

Report: Generic drugs saved $193 billion in 2011

Fruit flies offer DNA clue to why women live longer

Most popular last issue: St. Elizabeth hospital elevates ED performance with IT

Hot Clips: ICD-10


Featured Article: Social Media

Why online social networking should change what we know about healthcare

The rise of ubiquitous online connectivity between patients and their physicians is bringing a new era to those who prefer to interact from the safety of their own environments.

By Henry Wei, M.D.

Read the HMT article >

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EMRs

Patient data outage exposes risks of electronic medical records

Dozens of hospitals across the country lost access to crucial electronic medical records for about five hours during a major computer outage at the end of July, raising fresh concerns about whether poorly designed technology can compromise patient care.

Read the L.A. Times article. >

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Education

Nursing schools struggling to find professors

There have been lots of parties this year at the University of Virginia School of Nursing, but Dean Dorrie Fontaine is in no mood to celebrate. So far, 11 professors have retired, a full 25 percent of the whole faculty. The health law is predicted to boost demand for nurses to take care of the newly insured, especially in primary care.

Read the KHN article. >

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Doctors

Scalpel-throwing surgeons stun anger management pioneer

Anderson & Anderson has trained and certified at least 11,000 anger management specialists. Last year, for the first time, more than a third of the company’s income came from medical workers.

Read the Bloomberg article. >

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Rx

Cash rewards keep people on their medications

Weekly rewards of as little as $5 could keep people on track with their medications, says a new study.

Read the Reuters article. >

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Infectious Diseases

Hospitals investigate start-up technologies for superbug disinfection

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has said 2012 will be the year that hospitals should start paying to treat infections contracted on their premises. Many investors have the issue pegged as a janitorial concern, and not necessarily the purview of high-tech gadgets. But others see an enormous unmet need, where several small companies are vying to unseat giants like Johnson & Johnson in a potentially lucrative field.

Read the WSJ article. >

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Hospitals

Less hospital noise improves patient care

What patients endure in hospital rooms borders occasionally on deafening. A study this year from the University of Chicago found that peak noise levels sometimes approached the level of a chain saw.

Read the NYT article. >

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Innovations

Scientists treat ulcers with 'spray-on skin'

Scientists said Friday they had developed a revolutionary "spray-on skin" treatment for venous leg ulcers – a common ailment involving a shallow, open and stubborn wound on the ankle or lower leg. Using a spray of skin cells suspended in a mixture of proteins that aid blood clotting, the team treated 228 patients in the United States and Canada and found it greatly improved and accelerated wound closure.

Read the AFP article. >

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Rx

Report: Generic drugs saved $193 billion in 2011

Growing use of generic medicines has reduced U.S. healthcare spending by more than $1 trillion over the past decade, according to an industry-funded study released last week.

Read the AP article. >

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Research

Fruit flies offer DNA clue to why women live longer

Scientists believe they have discovered a clue to why women tend to live longer than men – by studying fruit flies.

Read the BBC article. >

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Most popular last issue: EDIS

St. Elizabeth hospital elevates ED performance with IT

Best-of-breed EDIS technology delivers positive care quality improvements, creating a safer and more efficient environment for patients.

By Chris Trevino, M.D.

Read the HMT article. >

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Hot Clips

Hot Clips: Decision Support

Click on the highlighted links below to read the top HMT archival properties concerning ICD-10, a topic that is at the forefront of healthcare discussions.

  1. How ICD-10 impacts revenue cycle management
  2. ICD-10 FAQ
  3. Five steps to avoid ICD-10 stress
  4. What ICD-10 means for doctors

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